Quick Links
X-ray,
Ultrasound, Computed Tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)
Nuclear Medicine, PET

Ultrasound -- Coming Soon

 

Frequently Asked Questions

What Is Ultrasound?

Why Is Ultrasound Performed?

What Can I Expect During An Abdominal Ultrasound Examination?

What Can I Expect During A Pelvic Or Transvaginal Ultrasound Examination?

What Can I Expect During A Vascular (Doppler) Examination?

How Long Will My Ultrasound Examination Take?

Is The Ultrasound Examination Safe?

Do I Need A Referral (Prescription) To Have My Ultrasound Examination?

When Will I Know The Results Of My Examination?

What Should I Do to Prepare for an Ultrasound Exam?


What Is Ultrasound?

Ultrasound is an imaging procedure that uses very high-frequency sound waves to produce an image of many of the internal structures of the body. It is painless and produces very precise images of certain parts of the body.

Why Is Ultrasound Performed?

Ultrasound uses high performance digital sound waves, not X-rays. For certain areas of the body these sound waves can image as well or better than other imaging devices. These sound waves are harmless and may be used with complete safety, even on pregnant women.

Abdominal ultrasound looks at internal organs such as gall bladder, kidney, or liver to assess pain or other symptoms.

Pelvic ultrasound in females looks primarily at the uterus and ovaries, but the bladder may also be visualized. In males, the pelvic ultrasound usually focuses on the bladder and the prostate gland.

Vascular ultrasound looks at the blood vessels in the neck arms, or legs to detect narrow or blocked arteries, or blood clots in the veins.

What Can I Expect During An Abdominal Ultrasound Examination?

The patient is positioned by the sonographer (technologist who performs the exam) on an examination table. A clear warm gel is applied to the skin over the area to be examined. This helps to transmit the sound waves by excluding air and will not harm your skin or your clothes. A soft covered device called a transducer is gently moved over the skin surface by the sonographer and images are produced on a monitor.

What Can I Expect During A Pelvic Or Transvaginal Ultrasound Examination?

The patient lies on a table with the abdominal area exposed and with a full bladder. The sonographer (technologist who performs the exam) will put a clear warm gel on the skin surface. The gel helps to transmit the sound waves by excluding air and will not harm your skin or your clothes. An instrument call a transducer is gently moved over the skin surface by the sonographer.

Pelvic ultrasound may include a transvaginal ultrasound to better see the ovaries and uterus. In this exam the patient is asked to empty the bladder. The patient will then be asked to place a covered transvaginal transducer (approximately the size and shape of a tampon) into the vagina, or if the patient would prefer, this will be placed by the female sonographer. The sonographer will then gently manipulate the transducer to provide an internal ultrasound examination. This is not painful and is the best way to evaluate the ovaries and uterus.

What Can I Expect During A Vascular (Doppler) Examination?

The patient will lie or sit on a table and the sonographer will put a clear warm gel on the skin surface of the area to be studied. The gel helps to transmit the sound waves by excluding air and will not harm your skin or your clothes. The sonographer will then gently press a transducer along the area. If the test is done on your neck, your head will be turned to the side, as if you were looking over your shoulder.

During the doppler ultrasound you may hear a "swooshing" noise. This is the sound of your blood flowing. You may also see tracings of your blood flow on the screen. These are normal occurrences.

How Long Will My Ultrasound Examination Take?

The abdominal ultrasound will take about 20 minutes. The pelvic ultrasound and the vascular (doppler) ultrasound will take about 30 minutes.

Is The Ultrasound Examination Safe?

East Texas Open MRI & Diagnostics provide state of the art equipment with high performance digital ultrasound with duplex and color doppler. The Radiologists and technologists (sonographers) have extensive experience and training in ultrasound. Since ultrasound uses sound waves rather than radiation, it is harmless.

Do I Need A Referral (Prescription) To Have My Ultrasound Examination?

Yes, your doctor must provide a referral (prescription) in order for you to receive a examination. In addition, some insurance carriers or HMO’s require a precertification. Please discuss this with your doctor and your insurance company or HMO prior to your test.

When Will I Know The Results Of My Examination?

A Radiologist will review your study before you leave the Center to determine if the information is complete. Preliminary results will be sent promptly to your physician and a detailed written report of the procedure, findings, and results will follow within several days. Your physician will then call you to discuss the results. Urgent results will be telephoned immediately to your doctor.

What Should I Do to Prepare for an Ultrasound Exam?

  • Abdominal Ultrasound
    Please do not eat solid food or drink anything after midnight prior to your exam. Routine medications may be taken with water only. If you are diabetic, consult with your doctor.
     

  • Pelvic Or Transvaginal
    Unless otherwise directed, there are no special preparations necessary.
     

  • Vascular (Doppler)
    No special preparation is necessary.

If you have any other question please click here to contact us.

 

top

   
   



Schedule: schedule@easttexasopenmri.com or 936.699.2798
Website contact: webmaster@easttexasopenmri.com

Website Privacy Policy  HIPAA Privacy Policy  Website Disclaimer
Copyright © 2011, East Texas Open MRI & Diagnostics